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I’m Jeff, from Earth.  I’m a digital nomad, currently stuck in Southern California until international flights resume so that I can return to Southeast Asia.

I’m a couple of blinks away from 70 years old, an artist, writer, teacher and former psychotherapist with M.A.s in Clinical Psychology and Somatic Psychology. My work is informed by 40 years of committed Dharma practice, extensive wilderness retreating, Classical Five Phase Chinese medical philosophy, mythography and oral tradition, and by modern science.

My Dharma orientation is both conservative and unconventional, naturalistic, rooted in classic Theravada, modern Vajrayana and Dzogchen. I understand mindfulness as a practice  of ‘remembering’, consistent with classical texts, rather than the very modern Western interpretation of mindfulness as a state of heightened ‘attention’. Remembering is a radical act that serves to radically clarify what and where we actually are. This clarity is powerful medicine that works to dissolve pathological alienation ... a very modern pandemic madness ... and cultivate organic sanity. In this age of uncertainty, mindfulness ... remembering what and where we are, and how we and where we are actually work, is critically important. 

My goal in this program is to refine my presentation of mindfulness in order to more skillfully present it to students as a survival skill as we face runaway climate chaos, runaway species extinction, a crumbling civilization and human existential crisis.

I’m also looking forward to discovering how others are applying mindfulness in their professional and personal interactions.  

 

Edited by jeffrey108miller@gmail.com
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2 hours ago, jeffrey108miller@gmail.com said:

My Dharma orientation is both conservative and unconventional, naturalistic, rooted in classic Theravada, modern Vajrayana and Dzogchen. I understand mindfulness as a practice  of ‘remembering’, consistent with classical texts, rather than the very modern Western interpretation of mindfulness as a state of heightened ‘attention’. Remembering is a radical act that serves to radically clarify what and where we actually are. This clarity is powerful medicine that works to dissolve pathological alienation ... a very modern pandemic madness ... and cultivate organic sanity. In this age of uncertainty, mindfulness ... remembering what and where we are, and how we and where we are actually work, is critically important. 

Hello Jeffrey! Thank you so much for the lovely introduction. I loved everything you wrote, but this part in particular stood out to me. I think you're right in saying that we don't tend to consider mindfulness to be a process of remembering, so indeed it is a radical act. Remembering vs. paying attention might more readily bring us back to a deeper understanding of our interconnectedness and our existence as pure awareness.

I resonate with your intention to present mindfulness as (how I've interpreted your words) a way of reconnecting with and healing the natural world. We cannot turn a blind eye to the devastation of this planet, and mindfulness I do believe plays a foundational role in our ability to live harmoniously with the earth we are an integral part of.

Thanks again for your words and I look forward to connecting with you again! Feel free to add to any ongoing threads or start your own as you feel called to. 🌍

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