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Gillian Florence

Who inspires your mindfulness practice and professional work?

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Welcome to our weekly questions! Each week I will pose a new question to the community to get some fresh dialogue going.

This week's question asks:

Who inspires your mindfulness practice and professional work?

Share the names of any people that inspire you to live and teach mindfulness, along with any books, resources, or additional teachings that have inspired your personal practice or professional work.

 

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I wish I could be more specific on who inspired me to start exploring mindfulness. For me it was just getting a little nuggets of information and starting to put those little nuggets together. I just found that I started to enjoy the mindfulness practices and found great benefit from it. Some thing that I do for myself is on occasion reflect on my reaction to things and ask myself what is the motive behind  my response and why did I react in such away. I contribute that practice to being my discovery of mindfulness. I started this at a Young age. I also found myself attracted to the mind body exercises of yoga and Pilates. So for me I would have to say it was a gradual concept that as I grow older becomes more and more important. With all the recent events happening around COVID-19 and the murder of George Floyd mindfulness is going to become even more and more essential to survive these times.

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Thanks for your response Sandra! I agree - mindfulness is becoming increasingly more essential as we navigate these times.

Like you, I find inspiration and influence from many teachers, teachings, and practices. My very first introduction to mindfulness came from reading Jon Kabat-Zinn's 'Wherever You Go, There You Are'. It blew me away in my early 20s as I had never encountered these types of concepts before. That was the beginning of my journey.

Now I find inspiration in people including (but certainly not limited to) Amoda Maa, Rupert Spira, Charles Eisenstein, and Tara Brach. But again, these names are just the tip of the iceberg! 

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My first introduction was through Jon Kabat-Zinn's  book Full Catastrophe Living (and then I went on to read most his other books), Sharon Salzberg's Loving Kindness and 28 day Mediation training, Dan Harris' book 10% Happier was also what helped open me up to this all as well.  I do have the 10% Happier App and enjoy it and the podcast very much.  I have also been helped by Pema Chodron, Jack Kornfield, Thich Nhat Han, and Tara Brach's work. I listen to Jack Kornfield's podcast still. I am also drawn to Mark Coleman (enjoyed his book Awake in the Wild) and am currently in a program almost wrapping up based on building resilience in nature. I am a big fan/proponent of being in nature, reconnecting and grounding in nature as part of my practice. Thanks for listening:)

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On 6/10/2020 at 12:49 AM, marnied@shaw.ca said:

I am a big fan/proponent of being in nature, reconnecting and grounding in nature as part of my practice. Thanks for listening:)

Lovely! I can relate to this inner calling/knowing.

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For a number of years I was a hospice volunteer. The people who have inspired me most have been those people who effortlessly, calmly and attentively, with a smile, vanished like morning dew on a leaf as the sun ascends. 

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4 hours ago, jeffrey108miller@gmail.com said:

For a number of years I was a hospice volunteer. The people who have inspired me most have been those people who effortlessly, calmly and attentively, with a smile, vanished like morning dew on a leaf as the sun ascends. 

Beautiful offering Jeffrey. This could be poem. 🙏

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I started practicing mindfulness and meditation six years ago. At the time, I was racing triathlons and was training for my first Ironman. The stress of work, starting a new job, the uncertainty and fear of the unknown about completing something like an Ironman, the mental fortitude it takes to train and race, along with the extremely high volume of training (I was training 45+ hours a week, 7 days a week) in addition to my daytime job and whatever social and familial commitments I could squeeze in, were taxing on me mentally and spiritually. I knew about meditation and felt like it could be beneficial, but I was so busy and active, I didn't have time to fit in a regular practice. The I read Rich Roll's book 'Finding Ultra', and one of the things he described was using his long runs and rides as active meditation. I started doing that and it was truly transformative.  My long runs (12-18 miles) and long rides (40-60 miles) became wonderful meditations. It has such an effect on me that I made meditation a daily part of my training. Ever since, I've been especially interested in forms of meditation that are beyond the cushion and finding ways to maintain my presence and awareness in all aspects of my life. 

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Wonderful! Thank you for sharing Bryan. It is interesting you mention Rich Roll. I just discovered his podcast a few weeks ago and have been avidly consuming it. I love his interviews with Zach Bush (among others).

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