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cortemc@gmail.com

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  1. Hi Melissa: I just saw your post. I hope you've found the help you were seeking and that you are doing ok. I know what it's like to live with trauma, and how sneaky it is...it just comes up when you least expect it. Unfortunately, I do not work with trauma, so I can't help you with that. But I do want to recommend two books that have helped me along the way: "The Dialectical Behavior Therapy Skills Workbook" by Matthew McKay; and "How to Heal Yourself from Depression When No One Else Can: A Self-Guided Program to Stop Feeling Like Sh*t" by Amy B. Scher. Both are available on Amazon, but I'm sure you can find them wherever you prefer to buy books. I hope these help. Namaste, Maria
  2. Hi Gillian: Today I read an excerpt from The Collected Works of Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche explaining the causes and remedies of samsara, or suffering. Central to Buddhism, as I understand it, is that feeding the concept or the "self" (the "I"/"mine" delusion) is one of the main causes of distorted realities, desires, and attachments, all of which lead to suffering (this much I understand and agree with). He then proposes that in order to stop the suffering, among other things, we must understand that the "self" is a mere concept and that we must examine the non-existence of the self. I would love to learn more about how we can learn to examine/understand the "non-existence" of the self, what does it really mean?
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