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  1. Hello everyone, I've been participating for a few weeks, but haven't done an introduction. My name is Melissa Loyer, and I'm from southern Ontario, Canada. I'm a 500 hour certified meditation coach, and I am so excited to be participating in this program. I've joined because while meditation coaching is good, and does good, my focus is teaching mindfulness meditation for mental health. Before learning to meditate, I wasn't able to cope with day-to-day life, as there was childhood trauma that ended up leading to anorexia nervosa, alcohol abuse, and a scary amount of self-injury. I remember vividly the moment I was told that the brain secretes thoughts in the same way the mouth secretes saliva, and that I am not my thoughts - I felt hope and bawled like a baby. I joined "The Power of Awareness", led by Jack Kornfield and Tara Brach and my life hasn't been the same since. I'm loving every moment of this course.
    4 points
  2. My name is Tasha and I am a bilingual & bicultural therapist. I so excited to embark on this journey of mindfulness with hopes to make it more accessible to BIPOC communities.
    3 points
  3. Hi everyone! I'm so excited to be here. I'm a physician in California who recently launched my life coaching practice empowering women to look within and quiet their inner critic to confidently live their best life. I have been practicing and sharing/leading mindfulness for over 8 years and want to go deeper so joined this program. Thank you for the opportunity to learn and connect!
    3 points
  4. I am a first generation Canadian born and raised in Cowtown (Calgary)! I began my spiritual journey over 20 years ago and have been meditating for more than 10 years. I feel so grateful to have come across mindfulness meditation over a year ago when the pandemic began and it has inspired me to want to teach this practice to others. I found this teacher training program recently which has inspired me even more to share mindfulness with others. My passions are nature photography and writing. Here's a pic of one of my favorite parks in Calgary. We have amazing walking trails and rivers where I walk and meditate every week. Give me a shout if you ever want to visit Calgary!
    3 points
  5. Hi Rosanna! Nice to see another Calgarian in the course! I also look forward to learning with you!
    3 points
  6. Hi to all of you, Excited to be here and starting this course. I am Gitika from Mumbai, India and a Yoga teacher, health coach and a sound healer. Really looking forward to enhancing my practice and learn from all of you.
    3 points
  7. Hey Banu, I just joined the community. I'm looking forward to start with the program. I'm also living in Cologne, Germany. Maybe we can catch up some day and have a nice talk about mindfulness. Cheers, Patrick
    3 points
  8. Hi, my name is Vincenzia My field of interest is on how mindfulness can be used in recovery. There are many approaches to recovery and I have noticed a shift towards more eastern approaches when it comes to support groups but not much with actual recovery programs people can enroll in (in-person or online). There is the 8 steps book and support group and then Refuge Recovery as far as I know. Both being incredibly helpful but barely scraping the surface of what is needed out there. Therefor I have dedicated two years to further learning of addiction and to strengthening my mindfulness practices in order to design a Mindfulness Recovery program that deals with food, social media, technology, nicotine and other form of addictions. I, myself have been in recovery for quite some time now and most likely wouldn't have been had it not been for my introduction to buddhism and mindfulness many years ago. I am a Certified Life Coach, artist and sculptor. I spent many years working with children with special needs and have a very special and personal interest in Autism. I would love to connect with anyone that also has any of these interests in order to share resources, experience and theories. Looking forward
    3 points
  9. Yes, it was the conversation about belonging. For me it was almost a little startling when Sean stood up and started saying I belong here over and over again. I actually got emotional as it is relevant to something I'm going through right now and I thought it was so powerful. I agree I can't imagine what it would have been like live. I just wanted to hug people! LOL Thanks for sharing the info.
    3 points
  10. Does anyone gravitate towards nature-based mindfulness practices? I would love to hear about how nature inspires your work or personal practice. Speaking for myself, I think part of what brought me to mindfulness in the beginning was respect for and reverence of the natural world. It has so much to teach us and I find a lot of peace in reflecting upon its various elements and its innate flow.
    3 points
  11. Sounds Cool, Anthony!! I began a Podcast too that I need to get back to; it is: https://anchor.fm/FinestCoaching-RickBarber >>my Theme: Global Mindful Meditation Education I would welcome any Mindful Guest Appearance! So check it out!!
    3 points
  12. Hi everyone, I'm Stacy Inness and I love in Las Vegas, Nevada USA. I recently joined Mindfulness Mastermind and I was so excited to see that is has evolved into a Teacher Training Program as well! I have had a couple different careers in my life so far, the most recent being a Pilates studio owner where I also brought in different people to host guided meditation sessions for the studio clients. This is something I have wanted to dive deeper into, and teach others mindfulness and meditations. I went on a 10-day Yoga Retreat trip to Rishikesh, India almost 4 years ago and it changed me. I am so thankful this course is here and I look forward to connecting with others to learn and grow through this journey. I had to close my studio due to COVID-19 a couple of months ago and have been looking at the different things I learned through being a studio owner as well as all the things I am truly passionate about, and what I really desire for my life moving forward. I love music of all kinds, traveling, yoga, Pilates, meditation, healthy eating...I am working on getting certified in those areas so I can present a complete package of knowledge to others and have the ability to personalize my coaching or teaching or guidance (whatever it ends up being) for each individual.
    3 points
  13. Hi Gillian! Yes I have read this book. The main takeaways I discovered are that we must acknowledge what our window of tolerance is in our day to day life in addition to tracking this during meditation as well as the following: Here are some helpful tips when someone is in a state of disregulated arousal: Muscle tone extremely slack (collapsed, noticeably flat affect) • Muscle tone extremely rigid • Hyperventilation • Exaggerated startle response • Excessive sweating • Noticeable dissociation (person appears highly disconnected from their body) • Noticeably pale skin tone • Emotional volatility (enraged, excessive crying, terror) Also, it’s suggested to “apply the brakes” when any hypoarousal (anxiety, panic, traumatic memories) occurs. For example: Open one’s eyes during meditation practice. • Take structured breaks from mindfulness practice (e.g., walking, stretching, unstructured time). • Take a few slow, deep breaths. • Engage in a soothing form of self-touch (e.g., hand on heart). • Focus on a resourceful, external object in one’s environment. • Engage in shorter practice periods. Unfortunately I have one client that reaches her window of tolerance unexpectedly and these tips only slightly help. For example, she will meditate and feel profoundly quiet inside and relaxed but then seemingly out of nowhere she will experience extreme nausea and experiences a panic attack. I am a mental health therapist so I am also helping this client reprocess old trauma with EMDR and TRE in a safe way but she really enjoys mindfulness meditation too. If anyone has any resources on this it would be so appreciative! So far we have “put on the brakes” when needed and shortened practice sessions. I would love to learn about new tools in situations like this if you have any to offer. Thank you!
    3 points
  14. For me mindfulness has helped me be more aware of my emotions and how they affect me. I don’t have to get wrapped up in all my emotions anymore. I realize that I am not my emotions. Mindfulness helps me to understand them by taking a step back and asking questions and observing. If I’m having a down day or feeling angry about something I can sit down and ask what is the source. Is the anger necessary and can I let the anger go. If I’m just feeling down mindfulness can help me see if there is some thing that is causing me to have a more blue mood. Maybe I just sit with the mood and be there or maybe I need to go out for a walk. Mindfulness helps me to know what I need to do to take care of myself.
    3 points
  15. The greatest gift mindfulness has given me is the deeper awareness of my connection to all things. Before mindfulness I was obsessed with finding that one special secret that I could adopt that would miraculously change my life. Whilst the journey has been interesting, in the end it has been regular mindfulness practice that has ultimately changed my world. It is now the foundation of my coaching practice. There is not a day goes by where I don't discover something knew about myself or the world around me - mindfulness has opened that door.
    3 points
  16. Hi community! I just wanted to post a quick note here to let you know that as of this evening, I will be starting a two-week personal retreat. Between now and June 21st, if you have any questions related to the program, you can send them over to support@mindfulnessexercises.com. I will not have access to my computer for much of this time. Enjoy your continued studies and I will touch base here in the community when I return. With gratitude, Gillian
    2 points
  17. HI Kelly, I think that is a great idea. Let's connect!!! tanatalk@outlook.com is my email address. I look forward to learning together. Have a beautiful day Tana
    2 points
  18. Hello to you all! I am Tirra pronounced TYRA from near Nashville TN. I am so excited to be here as I love mindfulness and want to lead mindfulness groups and sessions for women in my coaching program and through the non-profit, where I work called the Global Education Center. I mention this non-profit because they invested in me to get this training to help train teachers as well as lead community members in much needed mindfulness practices. I adore mindfulness because what it has done for me in my life and I look forward to growing personally and professionally through this training. So nice to meet you all!
    2 points
  19. Hello All my name is Christabelle and I am so grateful to be here. I have been practicing mindfulness meditation for nearly 20 years now and the practice has literally saved my life. I work full-time at the University of Oregon with college students who are first-generation, low-income, and in an underrepresented minority group. I am also a PhD candidate in Prevention Science with a focus on community wellness and equity promotion. From my research and personal experience, I believe we can reduce some of the negative impact of mental illness and perhaps even prevent the onset or at least, the escalation of illness. I have wanted to become a certified mindfulness meditation teacher for a long time so I can share this amazing set of tools I have learned and benefitted from. I’m so happy to be here and share this journey with you!
    2 points
  20. Friends, I am so happy to be a part of this community! I am learning a little bit each day and practicing. I work in community mental health (administration) in Arizona and and want to bring more opportunities for mindfulness in every situation. Next week I have two groups to lead with mindfulness, young mothers of new babies. I look forward to learning and growth, as well as being of service to all of you. All the best! Sukey D.
    2 points
  21. I am a physical therapist, and educator, a dreamer, and excited to learn more to be able to share mindfulness with others in a variety of settings.
    2 points
  22. Hey Everyone, I purchased the certification program a week and a half ago, right before I took a short vacay on the Big Island to visit friends. What an experience that was! Now, I'm ready to start the program and am introducing myself as a first ... well, second step. One of the other things I did was establish a structure on Evernote and in Google Drive to keep all of the info I know I'm going to accumulate organized. A semi-retired boomer originally from Washington, DC, I have been living in Hawaii for 14 years. My daughter came to Oahu to go to college and decided to stay. So of course, what's a mother to do for her only child but to join her? I'm also a long-time meditator, having first learned TM in the 70s when it was all the rage. My meditation journey has grown and evolved over the years, and now I'm ready to share it and mindfulness with others. I figured this program is the perfect opportunity for me to combine my passion for meditation with my experience as a trainer to help planetary consciousness evolve. evolve. Looking forward to sharing the journey with you. Patrice p.s. photo was taken at the beach near the North Shore of Oahu.
    2 points
  23. Thank you both for sharing. Relief of suffering and mental health concerns is certainly a common thread. I, too, came to mindfulness through mental health concerns – depression (and some anxiety as well). I first encountered mindfulness through Jon Kabat-Zinn's 'Wherever You Go, There You Are' and a lightbulb went off. I couldn't believe I'd never heard of the concept before! There is so much potential for healing. Thank you both for being here.
    2 points
  24. Hello Everyone - It feels wonderful to be embarking on this experience. I am a Zen Buddhist and a student of Roshi Joan Halifax with Upaya Institute, and I've also worked as a hospital chaplain. Most recently I'm working with our active military teaching integrated resilience and suicide reduction. I'm looking forward to learning so much from this course and hope to use it to deepen my own practice, but also help others use mindfulness as a tool. From a personal prospective I'm a Mom and Wife and in true Colorado form a lover of nature and the outdoors! Excited to meet others and share this experience as we each travel our own path! In Kindness - Paula Ekai
    2 points
  25. Hi Judy! I look forward to learning with you.
    2 points
  26. Great Question, Gillian! I knew I belonged here after my Phone conversation with Sean; certainly my Passion to help others has always been a strength with me, though some of those parties were not willing clients in my early days; moving forward I want to help others in local Community and hope to expand to Local Gov't agencies as well as the Healthcare Community as well having worked in Healthcare for over 11 Years. That takes two keys: The Openness and a Willingness. And before we can teach others we have to be able to be aware of our present moments with curiosity, and having no judgements. It's all an enlightening process! There's no magic here; it all takes practice! Maulana Rumi says it all: Poem by Maulana Rumi "When I run after what I think I want, my days are a furnace of distress and anxiety; If I sit in my own place of patience, what I need flows to me, and without any pain. From this I understand that what I want also wants me, is looking for me and attracting me. There is a great secret in this for anyone who can grasp it".
    2 points
  27. Welcome Judy, from a Transplant from Beantown!!:) I am Rick; I grew up in the Jamaica Plain District of Boston. Hope you get what you need from our program; you are amongst Friends! Gillian is a Great resource, & yet, so are we; let us know how we can help you:)
    2 points
  28. Hi All, My name is Cindy McDonough and I am new to this community. I am a health and wellness coach living in Cleveland, Ohio. After several years of coaching, I came to the realization that mindfulness is the key to behavior change and that's why I'm here!
    2 points
  29. Hey everyone, I'm Carol. I come from Kenya. I'm a teacher who has recently transitioned into the behavioral science world. Looking to teach mindfulness to as many people and hoping in my country people can adapt to practicing mindfulness.
    2 points
  30. Hi Everyone! I'm so excited and honored to be a part of this community. I started meditating in college as a way to deal with stress and anxiety, and I did that off and on for many years. In 2019, I committed to the practice in a way that I hadn't before, and decided I wanted to become a meditation instructor in my spare time, so I enrolled in a virtual course to do just that. I really enjoyed it, but I didn't know how to go about offering instruction. Then March 2020 came around, and I felt an even stronger desire to help others, but still wasn't sure quite how to do it. I think that meditation really helped me get through the scariest days (for me) of Spring 2020, and I wanted to offer this help to others. This year I decided I wanted to really go for it, and to broaden and deepen my education by enrolling in a second course, which is how I found Sean Fargo. I'm hoping to finally host meditation sessions and workshops on a more regular basis. I would love ANY and all advice on how to do that! Here's the fun twist: This summer, my husband and I are moving with our sweet Pomeranian terrier mix, Sadie, to Japan. I'm excited to see how/if I can potentially lead meditation or mindfulness sessions to English speakers there! -Julie
    2 points
  31. My name is Lucia. My motto is "Spark into the Moment". Really it is " Be present". My purpose in life is to be. Mindfulness is a constant practice, constant awareness and being with the amazing world that each of us carries within us. I am here to help myself do that and by extension learn how to share this with others. Thank you for providing this venue.
    2 points
  32. On a related note: Has anyone watched the 'Mindfulness' episode on the Netflix series, 'The Mind, Explained'? It features the work of none other than Richie Davidson.
    2 points
  33. Hi Tünde, nice meeting you too. Yes, Cologne isn't that far away -- looking forward to talk to you sometime.
    2 points
  34. Hi Banu, I'm quite close to you, also in Germany, close to Trier. Just to let you know maybe we could even meet one day, corona permitting. Tünde
    2 points
  35. Hi Gillian. I love that you are bringing this topic up for further discussion. Although I love so many things about this program, Sean standing up talking about belonging in the session has been the most powerful for me, possibly because I went through something for a long time recently where I felt I didn't belong. The strong reaction I had made me realize that it's something I really want to focus on. I have thought and written about worthiness and unworthiness a lot this past year, as conversations stemmed from a meditation group I was in. I will admit, worthiness and belonging are extremely sensitive areas for me, and although I have a lot I want to learn, I have already learned so much and it is changing my life. Part of the motivation for wanting to teach is so I can hopefully help others learn self-compassion, etc. For me, belonging means that you are accepted as you are. You have got me thinking a little bit about the relationship between unworthiness and belonging. Off the top of my head, I am thinking that you can feel worthy and still not feel like you belong. But I am definitely interested in thinking more about this and would love to hear what you and other people have to say on this topic! Thanks again!
    2 points
  36. Hi Lisa, I would love to connect with and being part of a small group. I'm just starting this course and it would be lovely to share and/or debrief. I'm in the UK. I love the Q.A sessions and I find Sean very calming and explaining things very well. Kind regards, Margaretha
    2 points
  37. Doing Great after our Deep Freeze, Gillian! Temp is a far cry from the Freezing Temps we had last week in TX.; believe me...I know your Winter feeling! Hope some Folks will be attending our 2PM/CDT Free Live Zoom Meditation today; here is the Link: https://us04web.zoom.us/j/2712027508... Theme is From Compassion to a Loving Kindness-Self-Compassion; hope some come!!:)...
    2 points
  38. Dear Gillian, Thank you for your response and for sharing the link to the article in the Inquiring Mind. Thank you also for deleting the second posting, much better to keep the conversation streamlined. I have read the article with much interest and there is much that stands out to me! First of all the finding that 'these precepts have been, I think, curiously under stressed by the vipassana community'. This is certainly not my experience, I have attended Vipassana retreats in the tradition of S.N.Goenka in Australia and the UK over the past 20 years, so maybe in this article, Gil is referring to the other vipassana retreats in the USA such as Spirit Rock and the Insight Centre in Barre. From my experience, the five precepts are certainly taught as a fundamental element on every single retreat in the Goenka tradition and their importance is stressed very highly. From this perspective, and from my own experience of working with the precepts and testing them in my own life, I agree with Gils initial point that "as the Western Vipassana movement evolves... the precepts can become increasingly helpful on our spiritual practice". The next point of interest for me is the quote from a vipassana meditation teacher "Precepts are not the main interest; wisdom and meditation are". What this represents for me is that in practice there appears to be a significant difference of focus of importance between the Goenka Vipassana tradition and the other American Vipassana centres. I think Gil Fronsdal's analysis as to the potential reasons for this difference are probably on point in terms of concerns from teachers about alienating people, however, if this were actually true, we should expect to see a significant lack of interest from westerners in attending the Goenka Vipassana retreats, when in fact their popularity consistently outstrips their capacity to offer places. At least in the UK for example, over the past few years if I wanted to book a place on a retreat (capacity of 180 people per retreat so not exactly small), I would have to register within a day or so of the course being advertised on line - about 2 months before the date of the retreat. This is almost akin to booking a ticket for Glastonbury Festival! From my perspective also, there is a clear difference between western ethics as commandments (with their religious connotations) and how they are presented through Vipassana retreats in a very practical way as leading to specific consequences that can be tested and experienced directly through sensations on the body, changes to the rhythm of the breath and agitation in the mind. This process offers an opportunity to 'critique' the validity of the precepts through one's own direct experience. This brings me to the section you pointed out which is referenced as 'perhaps the most important reason for the relative absence of discussion of the precepts' being the complexity of ethical dilemmas in real life situations. I have considered this and my response to it is that the way the five precepts are taught on Goenka Vipassana retreats stresses two key elements. First the importance of intention for all actions and second the focus on our direct experience of the consequences of performing 'unwholesome actions' and particularly on our ability to practice meditation - to develop insight, equanimity and compassion. There is a great quote from Jack Kornfield in the 'Clinicians Guide to Teaching Mindfulness' which I think nails it - “It’s hard to sit down for a peaceful meditation after a day of stealing, lying and killing“. I personally don't buy the argument of complexity as being a valid reason - although I can certainly see how some teacher might avoid discussing ethics as a result of it. This avoidance however seems to me to be out of sync with one of the core aspects of mindfulness - that of turning towards difficult experiences, emotions, sensations, of opening our hearts to them, of working with them. As Gil says later in the article "We may not find uncomplicated or satisfying solutions to ethical dilemmas, but we may come to better understand the complexity of some situations - or the unnecessary complexities that we sometimes create". I would go so far as to say that the avoidance of dealing with ethical complexity and difficult situations is potentially significantly problematic for mindfulness teachers and the mindfulness movement in general in terms of long term consequences. Of course there are many situations in life where we are faced with a choice between two options where someone ends up being harmed. We just have to work through it and the more present, mindful, compassionate and responsible we are able to be in that situation the better. When the 'sh*% hits the fan' we all want people who can keep calm, dispassionate, think clearly and compassionately and take appropriate responsibility, including helping clean up any resulting mess and ensuring follow up action, learning from the situation, future risk mitigation etc. The issue here is that if I haven't established a practice with a clear appreciation of the precepts (which are there to support development of the practice), my mindfulness practice may well have been frustrated so the consequences for me and everyone else involved in that situation are going to be affected - result, more suffering than otherwise might have been the case. My overall impression of the standpoint Gil takes here is that the five precepts should be part of mindfulness teaching and the more I reflect on this the more I think its important and should be included. I agree with the points Gil makes about the potential pitfalls of teaching the precepts - of leading to self-condemnation or self-righteousness and the suggestions made for how to avoid those. On the other side of the coin, I agree with the suggestion to present them as protections, recommendations on how to live safely - to 'create an environment of safety'. Here's a metaphor I have found useful to explain the importance of the precepts: Bicycles have always had brakes. If someone offered to sell you a bike without brakes, (assuming you understood the importance of brakes), you would probably say no; or arrange for brakes to be fitted pretty quickly. Brakes protect us, they help keep us safe. The ‘five precepts’ or ‘Sila’ as they are traditionally know, are like the ‘brakes’ to the ‘bicycle’ that is mindfulness meditation practice. Just like with brakes on a bike, you don’t have to use them, but knowing they are there, how to use them and why it’s probably a good idea is important isn’t it? As mindfulness teachers then, if we don't include sharing an appropriate teaching of the five precepts with students, then its a bit like selling someone a bike (who's never ridden one before) without brakes...isn't it? So as a result of reflecting rather deeply on this issue, I have decided to included teaching the five precepts in a mindfulness course I'm running at the moment. If you are interested I will let you know how my class respond and what issues (if any) arise from it. Thanks again for your kind response and especially in sharing the article with me. With metta! Tony
    2 points
  39. Thank you Amy! This is very good to know.
    2 points
  40. I just found this job if by chance anyone who stumbles across this is based in Halifax, Nova Scotia. In any case, it is another example of a job in the field (admin related, but you'd be working within a mindful team I imagine!) https://www.mindful.org/administrative-assistant-3/
    2 points
  41. Hey Gillian: As I am beginning my Mindful Meditation Scripts; here are some of mine: (My Email is: Finestcoaching524@gmail.com My Global Mindful Meditation Education Podcast: https://anchor.fm/FinestCoaching-RickBarber >>>I would love to have a Guest on for a Mindfulness discussion & Meditation sometime. Our Facebook: Global Mindful Meditation Group: >>>https://www.facebook.com/groups/GlobalMindfulMeditationGroup Care to do a Joint Meditation sometime? 254 Members are here in our group! Our Linkedin similar Group: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/12268868/ 69 Members are here! Feel free to join any all; support is needed at these. so let's connect:) Thanks.
    2 points
  42. I would have to say the traits that speak to me most are authentic, transparent, open minded, humor, and coachable themselves. I feel we are most able to grow, when those teaching us are also students in the process. Every client I have teaches me so much. That committment to growth and not ego to wisdom. that is my jammmm
    2 points
  43. The first thing that come to mind: a sense of humor! That just makes it all so much more accessible and makes me, as a student, take myself less seriously. But also: compassion. Great storytelling skills. An ability to call me and other students on our BS. An ability to tune in so well to what we're saying and where it's coming from.
    2 points
  44. One of the reasons for joining this program was to help in developing a new online initiative. (Or better said, reviving one I'd started back in 2017 but needed to put on the back burner during an international move.) I've set a goal of 52 posts within a year and it looks like this was too ambitious. That said, I managed to post the 6th of the lot today and since they've all been longer and more in-depth than originally planned, I think less will prove to be more. The site itself still needs a lot of TLC, but I'm glad it's up and running and getting a fairly regular run of new content. Anyone else blogging in this space?
    2 points
  45. Hey Gillian, Here is David Treleaven's Video from yesterday; he explains that this weekly Meetup is for any First Responders, whomever that may be and anyone else who has that Special Interest. David Treleaven’s Free Weekly Meet-up Titled: TSM Community Meet-Up | November, 2020 - Practices to support frontline workers during the pandemic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GpFMP8FQtec&feature=youtu.be. It is very insightful and inspiring!!! He only has an hour, though he sets up Break out groups of about 3 for Informal chats and Intros! I met with 2 Female Coaches from Canada; we had short fruitful conversations!
    2 points
  46. That's wonderful Anthony! Is there a link to your blog or website? I am a freelance writer though I haven't been writing too much of my own content lately (aside from in my journal). However, it is interesting you bring this up because I have set an intention to write an article this week to post on my own website or Medium account. I plan to start working that muscle again, just letting things free flow according to whatever is moving through my heart and mind at the moment.
    2 points
  47. @AnthonyM - Thank you for sharing your TED Talk! That was a wonderful watch. I love these two questions - 'Are my thoughts useful?' and 'How do they behave?' Thank you for stating those so clearly. I am going to practice mantra meditation this afternoon
    2 points
  48. My partner is a teacher at a large college in London and we have hosted some awesomely powerful and transformational mindfulness sessions there and we have also hosted some not-so successful mindfulness sessions there. Looking back at what made the more successful ones successful vs the unsuccessful ones, we have learned a lot when delivering mindfulness to younger people and children. I had always seen it as a control thing, the more I was in control, the better the teaching experience was for me. Children have the ability to be disruptive and struggle to take things seriously sometimes. It can be hard for an adult to close their eyes and be left to manage their thoughts, let alone a child. We have experienced all kinds of reactions from storming off to crying but the most common one is, you guessed it... laughing. When I first started my journey with younger people, I would find the laughing disruptive and I would also see laughter (uncontrolled by an individual or group) in the session as my inability to control the group or control the situation. Feeling out of control in a situation can often make you feel like you want to control the individual so that you can take control again and bring the learning experience back to what you had planned. I have discovered that letting that control go and making the laughter, jokes and disruption a part of the process (to a degree) can help you let go of the control element. Behaviours, what ever they may be, are a part of the process for children. I am not saying that we condone negative and disruptive behaviour but what I am saying is that we need to identify the behaviours that are reflected as an outcome of a difficult process for a child and use that as part of their experience. I have found this to be a powerful tool when supporting younger people. If they want to laugh, then lets laugh and lets be explore that with an open mind, lets discuss why we laughed and talk about how we deal with things as a group before giving it another go. Once you have broken through this barrier, you can explore anything in your meditations, from compassion to gratitude with a much more attentive group. Letting go of my expectations and wanting to be in control has been a massive learning process for me but it has facilitated a much more explorative process for the kids- this is where the magic happens. As they discover their feelings and thoughts in a less controlled environment, they come up with these gems of insight that end up teaching us.
    2 points
  49. Hey Mark, So first of all, your question reminds me of something that was put up on Mindfulness Exercises a few months ago. It's a simple guide for dealing with anxiety during covid times, so it might be a good resource to consider: https://mindfulnessexercises.com/dealing-with-covid-19/ There are so many different practices one could explore, but two that stand out are 1) breathing practices that ease the stress response, and 2) those that increase our sense of community. The first (such as diaphragmatic breathing) can help us to manage the physiological effect of heightened stress, whereas the second is so important given that I think many people are feeling isolated and alone right now. Online meditation groups could be helpful for those want to feel some connection but aren't ready or able to connect in person with groups. There's also a resources on ME from a while back that features some online groups. I'm not sure how many are still running, but it could be something for your clients to check out: https://mindfulnessexercises.com/online-mindfulness-meditation-groups-to-join-during-covid-19/
    2 points
  50. Hello Gillian, great to meet you! I'm a fellow airy person, gemini Also love journalling.... Look forward to connecting more, Lisa
    2 points
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